Video Gallery

 

A non-conserver producing gestures that match her speech.  The child says, “They’re different because you spreaded them apart,” while producing a gesture that mimics the experimenter’s movements.

 

 

A non-conserver producing gestures that do not match her speech.  The child says, “They’re different because you moved them,” while indicating in gesture the one-to-one correspondence between the checkers in the two rows.

 

Interviewers’ gestures serve as a source of information (and, at times, misinformation) that can lead witnesses to report incorrect details. In this case, the child reports that the musician he saw was wearing a "music hat."  Broaders, S., & Goldin-Meadow, S. Truth is at hand: How gesture adds information during investigative interview. Psychological Science, 2010, 21(5), 623-628. doi:10.1177/0956797610366082. Abstract, PDF